Pursha and Cucumber Cake: an #EatSussex experiment

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August may be the perfect month for summer fruit (have you tried gorgeous sweet August cherries  or tart summer plums?), but sometimes you really just need a little indulgence. And, while we’ve been baking bread, cooking up stews, and experimenting with plenty of savory foods, we haven’t cooked up any #eatsussex desserts…

…until now!

Muir whipped up this pursha and cucumber cake using only Sussex grown and sourced ingredients (#EatSussex adapted from a Veggie Desserts recipe). Which means – no sugar! Our Sussex sweetener of choice? Local, raw runny honey from Blackman Bee Farm.

This cake was delicious – though definitely far from a conventional cake in regards to flavour, texture, and, well, everything. Made with a robust and fruity tasting wholemeal flour, it didn’t exactly form the airy base of a Victoria sponge. With plenty of honey to sweeten, the result was more a dense, buttery ‘honey-bread’ with citrus notes than conventional cake (which still sounds pretty good to me).

Recipe

1 medium cucumber
A handful of pursha (or use an unwaxed lemon)
200g wholemeal flour
2 eggs
150g butter
150g honey
A pinch of baking powder

For the glaze
2 tablespoons of Gin
2.5 tablespoons of raw honey
(we recommend using lemon juice, but we did’t have any Sussex grown lemons!)

Preheat the oven to 170 degrees Celsius. Lightly grease a 9 inch round cake tin.

In a food processor, blitz the cucumber and whole purshas/lemon. Add in the butter, eggs and honey and process to combine. Next, to the wet ingredients, add in the baking powder and flour and thoroughly blend until a smooth cake batter in formed (Yes, it’s that easy!).

Pour the batter into the cake tine and bake in the oven for 30 minutes/until golden brown. Allow to cool and remove from the tin.

For the glaze, whisk together honey and gin/lemon juice to form a liquid.  Pour over the cooled cake  – and enjoy!

cake.pngMuir enjoying a slice of cake.

What did we learn about making #EatSussex cakes?

It’s not so easy! Without sugar and white flour, a traditional fluffy, sweet cake is off the table. But still, we loved this wholesome alternative. Next time, we might even make a vegan version (as soon as we get those apples in for apple sauce…) In the meantime, though, it might be easier to stick to easy summer crumbles and Sussex yogurt with honey and berries…

Do you have any #EatSussex dessert ideas? We love cooking up gorgeous produce and using Sussex-sourced ingredients, so if you have some favourites or baking inspiration – let us know in the comments!

PURIngredients for baking.

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Pursha and Cucumber Cake: an #EatSussex experiment

Raw Sussex Honey from Blackman Bee Farms

Mickelmus Blackman and his bee smokery from last summer

Mickelmus Blackman started beekeeping from one hive in his garden in Hove and quickly developed to a few hives before starting his ethical, sustainable beekeeping enterprise.

From his hives dotted around Brighton and Hove, we have the wonderful Raw Honey – both set and runny.

From his work with other farms in the Sussex area, Mickelmus also produces English Heather Honey and English Borage Honey.

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How raw honey is good for you

Raw honey has a wealth of uses and benefits which we explored in our blog earlier this evening from cough mixtures to cake sweeteners and even shampoo and face wash.  Studies by Glasgow University have shown that honey other than just Manuka, which is famous for its antibacterial properties – also have useful bacterial fighting qualities.  And fresh honey produced on your doorstep is surely better in terms of freshness.

Plus the carbon footprint to bring you this honey is tiny when you consider it’s collected and bottled all within a 30 mile radius.  Some commercial honeys are the collective produce of lots of producers and even different countries before being freighted to a bottler…despite their pure labels.

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Heather Honey (English)

A perfume that is almost herbal.  Nick says it has a citrussy kick to it.  The texture is grainy like large salt grains from the comb and it’s a dark set honey.  A lovely honey to spread on thick wholemeal toast.

Borage Honey (English)

Lightly scented and ivory clear. The flavour is delicate and smooth and not overly cloying in terms of sweetness.  This would be a good natural sweetener for drinks or cakes or drizzling over pancakes.

Raw Honey, Runny (Brighton and Hove)

Sweet and with a rich honey flavour with almost a very slight smokiness to it.  Deliciously light and smooth texture.  The colour is a beautiful strong gold and again, would make a fabulous breakfast honey.

Raw Honey, Set (Brighton and Hove)

A velvety texture and a buttery creamy flavour.  Now this seems like the perfect Sunday morning honey.


Raw Honey Roasted Beetroot and Carrots

carrotbeetroot

Ingredients

  • 4 medium carrots, diced
  • 1 tbsp cider vinegar
  • 2 tbsp raw runny honey
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 beetroots, quartered
  • 25g pumpkin seeds
  • handful fresh parsley, chopped.

First simmer the beetroot in its skin until tender and cooked through.  Cooking in the skin is easier than peeling as you can just rub this off with your thumb when cooked.

Heat the oven to 180 degrees/160 degrees fan/gas 4.

In a bowl, toss together the carrots, vinegar, honey and olive oil.  Spread on a baking tray and roast for 30 mins.

About 5 mins before the end of cooking, add the beetroot and return to the oven.

When cooked, leave to cool a little, then toss with the pumpkin seeds and chopped parsley.

Keep this local with a raw cider vinegar with mother from Ringden Farm and Mesto Extra Virgin olive oil produced in Crete from the family farm of Brighton based Cate and Vasillis.

Visit our website at www.finandfarm.co.uk

Raw Sussex Honey from Blackman Bee Farms

So many ways to use Raw Honey

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Source

Blackman Bee Farm – Hove

So, our honey comes from Blackman Bee Farm where Mickelmus has extended his hives from just his back garden in Hove to all over the city and working with farms in the Sussex region.   Honey is a hard-working ingredient to keep as your cupboard staple and here are just a few ways to use it…

Continue reading “So many ways to use Raw Honey”

So many ways to use Raw Honey