The Best Sussex Breakfast

We headed over to Kemptown’s award-winning boutique bed and breakfast, The White House Brighton, to talk to owner and chef Sean. We find out what makes Brighton the best city in the country, why using local food is better for business, and just what the best Sussex breakfast to cook is…

Watch below for the full interview:

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Love Brighton or have a favourite Sussex breakfast? Let us know in the comments!


Love eating Sussex grown and produced food? Use the hashtag #EatSussex and tag us in your social media so we can see your gorgeous Sussex posts! Want to be featured in our blog? Contact us – we’d love to hear from you!

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The Best Sussex Breakfast

Sussex Organic Eggs from Springles Farm

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As you know, at Fin and Farm, we are committed to only selling the best produce.  We’ve been asked about certified organic eggs (although all our eggs are absolutely free range and not fed with grain that has added growth hormones or other undesirable chemicals).

When we were researching eggs, the reality of what constitutes free range, in some cases, is pretty thin and welfare statements about access to fresh air, light and space can be manipulated.  This is why we carefully choose our farms and although organic eggs are subjected to tighter regulation, we wanted to see for ourselves before introducing them on our list.

So we visited Springles Farm in Barcombe this week and had the chance to meet Andy, the owner of the farm. He gave us a tour, where we saw the chicken-roosts and the large fields available for the hens to roam.

Andy and his team believe that their hens deserve a happy and healthy life, providing them with an environment that meets their needs. Hens –for example- have easy access to the outdoors (as you can see in the picture above). They must live in a place that gives them fresh air, light, space to exercise, clean food, water and plenty of bedding.

And as taking care of his hens is the most important thing for him, Andy feeds them with high-quality organic feed. The chickens are fed with Humphrey Feeds, which is produced by a family run local company which has 80 years experience of highest quality feed.


 

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Lots of eggs are misshapen…which you’ll never see in the supermarkets… so we asked Andy about it, and he told us that funny shaped eggs are pretty common.  It take approximately 25 hours for a hen to produce an egg and all kinds of things can affect the shape of the egg… maybe a result of something simple, like being bothered by another hen who’s trying to steal her roosting spot or the food she has been eating. It happens all the time, but these eggs are often rejected by large supermarkets, so we are used to seeing only the perfectly regular specimens – sadly.

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Storing eggs

There are lots of schools of thought about storing eggs.  It is thought that if you do keep them in the fridge, then it’s best not to store in the door.  The constant change in temperature can cause them to degenerate quicker.

Eggs in the supermarket aren’t kept in the fridge, but they are at a pretty constant temperature and it does seem that the rule of thumb is that keeping them chilled gives them the same consistent temperature to keep them as fresh as possible.

Bring eggs up to room temperature before cooking to stop the yolks from breaking too easily.

Can you freeze eggs?

Apparently, yes – this blog from Home Farmer gives you lots of tips on freezing eggs.  However, it seems that the best use is for cakes as eating a gelatinous egg white doesn’t fill us with glee with our morning scrambled egg.


 

Visit us at www.finandfarm.co.uk

 

 

 

 

Sussex Organic Eggs from Springles Farm

Roasted Tomato Soup with Cheddar Dumplings

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I keep being drawn back to this chef’s website simply because their food photography is so good it makes me hungry enough to want to just dive into the kitchen and cook.

This soup is just so smooth, velvety and moreish…a real hats off to simple produce that can be sourced around Sussex easily…well for the next couple of weeks, at any rate.  Our fabulous Nutbourne tomatoes will be finishing soon, so there isn’t too much opportunity left to enjoy a bowlful.

The cheddar dumplings are so simple, and an upgrade from our usual crusty bread and cheese on the side.  This recipe calls for Davidstow Cheddar but we pooh-pooh stuff from all that way over the other side of the country as we have our own amazing Sussex Cheddar – both organic and non-organic.  Cheddar is hearty and sweet, but we also like to experiment with cheese with a slightly nuttier and more mature flavour – like the Olde Sussex, from The Traditional Dairy or Lords Burgh from Plumpton Down.

This soup works with a ripe classic vine tomato and don’t skimp on quality.  Tinned tomatoes are great as a cupboard basic, but there is a massive difference in tomato soup as canned or even tetrapak-ed tomatoes will leave a slight metallic aftertaste.  A good ripe fresh vine tomato will give a more rounded edge.

Any breadcrumbs will also work, but Monica Shaw, this recipe’s cook recommends wholemeal – and we found they did make a difference to the flavour.

Ingredients

  • Roasted tomato soup

  • 1kg tomato, ripe
  • 1 carrot, peeled and diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch of basil, small, separated into leaves and stalks
  • 600ml vegetable stock
  • Cheddar cheese, grated
  • olive oil
  • Dumplings

  • 2 slices of bread, crumbled, or approximately 55g of breadcrumbs
  • 3 eggs, beaten
  • 55g of Cheddar cheese
  • salt
  • black pepper
1.  Preheat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5
2.  Cut the tomatoes in half and arrange cut-side up in a baking dish. Drizzle with a little olive oil and season with salt and pepper
3.  Bake for approximately 1 hour, until the tomatoes are totally soft and beginning to char around the edges
4.  Heat a couple tablespoons of olive oil in a pan over a medium heat and add the onion, carrot and garlic. Cook for approximately 7 minutes until softened. Meanwhile, chop the basil stalks and addd to the pan. Cook for another minute
5.  Add the roasted tomatoes (including any juices that seeped out) to the pan along with the vegetable stock. Stir, bring to the boil, then turn the heat down. Cover and leave to simmer for about 10-20 minutes (until the carrots are very soft)
6.  Blitz the soup in a blender then return to the pan and gently reheat
7.  Meanwhile, make the dumplings by mixing together all of the ingredients – you should have a moist doughy mix that’s easy to shape into small balls (about the size of a teaspoon)
8.  Drop the balls into the hot soup and simmer with a lid on for approximately 10 minutes
9.  Ladle the soup and dumplings into bowls and garnish with grated cheddar cheese and fresh basil leaves before serving
Roasted Tomato Soup with Cheddar Dumplings