Mini Recipe Roundup! #EatSussex Inspirations…

If you’re curious about some of the #EatSussex August dishes we’ve been eating, here’s a few snapshot recipes to (hopefully) inspire you to try some 100% Sussex-sourced cooking. Quality is essential for creating delicious food, and with unusual varieties from small-scale producers, our #EatSussex meals are a joy to eat. Believe me, you haven’t eaten kale until you’ve tried our amazing organic red kale…

Garlic Crushed Comfort Potatoes

A comfort recipe for delicious garlicky crushed potatoes. Using our amazing Sussex grown potatoes really add flavour and texture!

You’ll need: 
4-5 flavoursome medium-sized Sussex potatoes (we used Pink Fir Apples)
4 -5 cloves of garlic, peeled (we got ours from a friend with an allotment!)
A generous glug of Mesto Olive Oil
Salt and pepper

Boil the potatoes whole in salted water. When al dente, add in the garlic cloves whole and continue to boil until the potatoes are fully cooked. When soft, drained and crush the potatoes, garlic and a generous amount of olive oil with a potato presser or fork. This should be fairly roughly crushed – not a smooth puree like conventional mashed potatoes. Season well and serve with greens, a stew, pulses, sausages – anything you like!

IMG_0870 (3)                     Try different potato varieties to discover delicious flavour nuances!

 

Kale and Potato Soup

This recipe was created after a craving for leek and potato soup. We didn’t have any Sussex leeks, so we adapted with very good results!

You’ll need:
Mesto Olive Oil
2 cloves of garlic
2 medium Sussex onions
Several flavoursome Sussex potatoes
A generous bunch of kale
1 generous tsp cumin
1 generous tsp black pepper
A few stems of fresh rosemary
Rosemary and hemp bread to serve.

Saute the onions in a good serving of olive oil. When they started to soften, add in the garlic, cumin and black pepper. Roughly chop the potatoes and add to the pan. Cover with water, adding the rosemary, and allow to slowly simmer until the potatoes are soft (approx. half an hour). At the end of cooking, add in the fresh kale, roughly chopped, and continue to cook for a few minutes until the kale is tender.

Serve steaming hot with slices of fresh wholemeal sussex bread! (We love our rosemary and hemp recipe for extra flavour).

kalesoupA satisfying evening meal of beautifully flavoured kale soup.

Spiced Summer Apples

If you want something that’s a bit of a treat but still on the wholesome side, this seasonal apple dish will satisfy. With borage honey, sweet-sharp apples and notes of cardamom, cinnamon, and ginger, you’ll be dreaming of this dish for summers to come…

You’ll need:
2 tart discovery apples, diced
1 good teaspoon of borage honey
A splash of Elderberry liqueur
1 generous tsp mixed spice
1 tub of creamy biolive Sussex yogurt

In a pan with a splash of elderberry liqueur,  simmer  the chopped tart discovery apples with a teaspoon of honey and mixed spice. Cover and simmer until the apples are soft and the flavours have melded (about 15 minutes). Serve hot with cool, thick, creamy biolive Sussex yogurt straight from the fridge.

summerapplesPink discovery apples are worth waiting the year for!


Do you have any #EatSussex recipes? Use the hashtag #EatSussex and post to your social media so that we can see and share your seasonal discoveries and cooking adventures!

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Mini Recipe Roundup! #EatSussex Inspirations…

Apple juice from Ringden farm

Morgane’s interview with Scott at Ringden Farm

During our visit to the Ringden farm – Hurst Green, East Sussex – Scott, who is working on the farm, answered a few questions.

 

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Could you tell me the story of your farm? Why did you become a farmer?

 Well I work in the family business, I am not one of the family. But it’s been a family business for over 50 years now and they were mainly just growing apples and pears but due to a violent hailstorm one year, they lost lots of their crops so they decided to branch out into making apple juice. Since then, they have won several awards, both for speciality fruits but also for individual juices themselves. They’re well known within the industry for their knowledge and we have over 48 varieties of apple juice so it’s one of the largest selections in the UK. We’ve also since branched out into doing small range of blended drinks.

To celebrate our 50th anniversary last year we introduced a range called “Bentley’s” which was named after the grandfather who actually bought the farm over 50 years ago. They’re all familiar apple juice–based drinks. We also produce drinks like lavender lemonade, elderflower and lime, and lemonade and lime.

The other products we have now, which we introduced last year, is an elderflower cordial, which is made using fresh elderflowers.  Also we make a raw cider vinegar, which is unpasteurized. It has great health benefits.

Thank you! So how long have you been working on the farm?

About 5 years.

Where do you grow your fruit? 

The majority of fruit is grown on the farm, but because they’re third generation here they know all the farmers around, we share unusual varieties with some neighbouring farms as well.

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Thanks. What methods do you use to make an apple juice?

Basically, when the apples come in, they get hand picked from the trees and put into apple bins. Then they go to the press itself and the apples and any badly bruised apples will get taken out.  All the apples are washed, then they go on to the belt where steel drums will actually squash them. The juice goes into stainless steel trays and then get put into big pads. After they have settled, the next day, after the settlement has fallen to the bottom the juice is bottled and pasteurised.

How many litres do you produce a year?

We produce 350 000 litres per year.

How many apples do you need for a bottle of apple juice?

About 8 apples. It depends on what apples as some are more juicy than others!

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Do you grow anything else?

We grow a small amount of quince and some medlars.  We also have some strawberries and gooseberries.

How do you treat your trees?

Minimally – we don’t overspray our trees.  We sell what they call “ugly fruits”. It’s more natural and better for everyone.

 

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Nathan and Scott, from Ringden farm.

 


Visit us for more info at : www.finandfarm.co.uk

Apple juice from Ringden farm

Leftover Light Apple Fruit Cake

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A leftover apple cake that is lighter than traditional fruit cakes – would make a perfect Simnel cake.

I was browsing ways of using up a couple of our Ringden Farm Egremont Russets and Jonagold apples that were a little past their prime and thought I’d make a cake for a friend coming over for supper.  Cake recipes are generally heavy on refined sugar one way or another so we thought the best balance is probably to incorporate more fruit and eat a delicious cake in smaller slices, using the best ingredients possible.

This cake is pretty much a lighter version of a fruit cake, but you could swap leftover ingredients or use whatever dried fruit you have in the cupboard.  It would work equally well with cranberries, cherries or pears.

It’s a nice grown-up kind of cake as well, that would work equally well with afternoon tea or as a delicious Easter Simnel Cake.

One thing is that we don’t eat cake every day – but when we do, it has to taste bloody good. We came across this cake on the BBC site, which with a bit of tweaking became the cake below and it’s one we’ve added to our little black book of cakes to repeat.

The comments on the BBC site said their cake was a little crumbly, so we upped the apple content to give it some moisture (worked brilliantly) and to counterbalance the fat.

It’s a little heavy on the butter side, but we only use Sussex Southdowns butter and this is our small indulgence (Southdowns is a traditionally-made butter that goes off if you don’t use it, unlike most commercial butters which must be irradiated or something…).

We have pinned this recipe in our December notes as it would make a fantastic lighter Christmas cake if you include homemade glacé cherries and nuts.  On the subject of which, if you’re foraging around at the back of the cupboard, then we found the remains of a bottle of Cointreau from the Christmas cocktails and soaked the dried fruit beforehand.

Nick is most definitely not a fruit cake fan, but he liked this as it has a lighter texture and is more moist and plump than a traditional fruit cake without the heavy leaden lining on your stomach afterwards!

Apple Fruit Cake

Ingredients

  • 150g dark muscovado sugar
  • 200g unsalted butter, softened plus extra for greasing
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 large tbsp blackstrap molasses
  • 200g spelt flour
  • 2 tsp mixed spice
  • 3 tsp baking powder
  • 2 good size eating apples , grated (approx 120g each)
  • 300g mixed sultanas and raisins
  • A drizzle of Cointreau or brandy
  1. Put the dried fruit in a dish and drizzle over the liqueur.  Leave to absorb for a couple of hours.
  2. Heat oven to 180C/fan 160C/gas 4.
  3. Butter and line the bottom of a deep, round 20cm cake tin with greaseproof paper. Beat the first seven ingredients together in a large bowl (electric hand- beaters are best for this), until pale and thick. Using a large metal spoon, gently fold in the fruit until evenly combined.
  4. Spoon the batter into the tin and bake for 50 mins-1 hr or until the cake is dark golden, springy to the touch and has shrunk away from the tin slightly. A skewer inserted into the centre will come out clean when it’s ready.
Leftover Light Apple Fruit Cake

Howgate Wonder Baked Apples With Rhubarb

apple

Of course, we always recommend our Bramley apples from Ringden Farm over near Etchingham – BUT on this occasion we urge you to try the early Howgate Wonders.  When they are picked early they are mild and citrussy but their flavour mellows over time.  They are a different kettle of fish to the Bramley so ring the changes with a traditional Edwardian cooking apple.

This recipe waxes lyrical about eating outside on a summer’s day – but since apples and rhubarb are at their sweetest and best, we will have to sit by the radiator and pretend.

A note about the recipe….we wouldn’t bother with the demerara sugar, sticking as we do to a good local honey…especially a borage honey if you can find it, for the fragrant rosy flavour and aroma.

We also sell delicious creamy yoghurt but the large tubs are generally to special order, as most people prefer low fat, these days.

To overcome this and keep variety in our fridge, we often have a pot of Northiam Creme Fraiche and mix with low fat yoghurt (if we mix it – it’s so rich and creamy, it’s tempting to leave as is)…it gives another layer of tart depth to the flavour which works well with the malic acid in the apples.

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Baked Howgate Wonder apple and rhubarb with vanilla-honey yoghurt

Ingredients

Serves 6

  • 6 apples
  • 150g of rhubarb, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp of muscovado sugar
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 15g of butter
  • 1 tbsp of Demerara sugar, to sprinkle
  • 200g of Greek yoghurt
  • 40ml of honey
  • 1 vanilla pod
1  Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6.
2  Score each apple horizontally to slightly pierce the skin – this allows the flesh to expand while cooking.
3  Core the apples by pushing an apple corer down through the apple until it pierces the bottom, discard the core. Repeat for all apples.
4  Mix the rhubarb, brown sugar and cinnamon together in a bowl. Stand the apples up side by side in a baking dish.
5  Use your fingers to push the rhubarb mixture into each apple, dividing the mix evenly.
6  Add a blob of butter to the top of each and sprinkle over the Demerara sugar.
7  Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes or until the apples are cooked through – you can check this by piercing the apples with a skewer.
8  Meanwhile, split the vanilla pod in half with a small knife. Scrape out the seeds and add to a bowl with the yoghurt and honey, whisk to combine.
9  Remove the apples from the oven and allow to cool slightly. Serve on plates with the yoghurt. Drizzle over the juices from the baking tray.

 

Recipe by Nathan Outlaw – Great British Chefs

Howgate Wonder Baked Apples With Rhubarb

Proper Sussex Bramley Apples

Bramley

The other day, Nick took this picture of these Bramley apples from the farm at Ringdens. Just so different from those monstrous waxy green supermarket specimens…. local fruit picked from orchards are blushed and rosy with an almost lime-coloured flecked white flesh, these have a wholesome apple flavour.  They are just slightly too tart to eat raw, but not massively.  Continue reading “Proper Sussex Bramley Apples”

Proper Sussex Bramley Apples

Toffee Apples – Luscious caramel with an unexected twist

Toffeeapples

Luscious caramel coated apples with the twist of popping candy perfect for Hallowe’en or Bonfire Night  Fortunately, there are Sussex apples in abundance to choose from that have the right content of tart fruitiness to balance the sweet toffee. Continue reading “Toffee Apples – Luscious caramel with an unexected twist”

Toffee Apples – Luscious caramel with an unexected twist

Celebrating this week’s new apples

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Photo: Gunar Magnusson

A diet rich in apples has been linked to a wealth of benefits such as weight loss, improved lung function and a lower risk of stroke, cancer and heart disease. Continue reading “Celebrating this week’s new apples”

Celebrating this week’s new apples