Baby turnips – the best kept secret of winter veg!

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One of the most ancient crops in the world, the turnips has undeservedly gotten a bad rap over the years. (Overboiled by your grandma maybe?)

But we’re here to change all of that!

Throw away the image of a bitter, fibrous root. The baby turnip bears nothing to it’s overgrown autumnal cousin. Delicate, sweet-fiery in taste (they’re a member of the mustard family after all), quick to cook and wonderfully versatile, baby turnips are the best keep winter-root secret ever.

Our baby turnips are grown by Becky and Trevor over in Sidlesham, Sussex, where they’ve grown vegetables for over forty years. Very local, and very fresh, did you know that our Sussex baby turnips are now in bigger bunches? Switch up your squash and potato game, and grab a handful of these beauties to spice up your meals with!

How to cook:

There’s no need to peel. Simply cut into quarters and saute or toss in oil and roast. Try stir frying with spices, fresh greens and adding to rice, or shave into a salad and toss with a flavorsome vinaigrette. Stir in the greens for extra health benefits and aroma.

Need some more cooking ideas? Here’s some of the most mouth-watering baby turnip recipes from around the web…

Enjoy local baby turnips while their growing season is here – go to our website and order now!


Image 1: Baby turnips and sorrel by Robin Catesby/FLICKR (CC)

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Baby turnips – the best kept secret of winter veg!

Sussex superfood salad – winter edition!

Brrr, there’s a cold spell on it’s way!

But that doesn’t mean you have to forgo the pleasures and nutritional benefits of a winter salad…

The secret? Go seasonal – and go Sussex!

Locally grown, fresh-as-can-possibly-be, nutrient dense foods are the perfect way to support and nourish your body – even when it’s bitter outside.

So delve into a generous serving of aromatic Sussex greens, sweet and salty roasted beetroot, immune-boosting honey-cider vinegar dressing  – all topped off with melt-in-your-mouth local goat’s cheese.

This salad is guaranteed to give you a healthy glow  – and a happy stomach.

Ready for some winter goodness?

The recipe:

Serves 2

For the salad:
Two local beetroots, sliced
Mesto olive oil, for roasting
Two very generous handful of Sussex rocket
A handful of Sussex parsley, torn
One bio-dynamic black Sussex radish, finely sliced in rounds
Three baby turnip, finely sliced in rounds
Local red onion, very finely sliced
Toasted crushed walnuts or almonds
One sweet-tart local Russet apple, cubed
Ash Golden Cross Sussex goat’s cheese, crumbled

For the dressing:
3 tbsp Sussex apple cider vinegar
2 tbsp Sussex cold-pressed hemp oil
1 tbsp raw Sussex runny honey
1 tsp fiery dijon mustard
1 small clove of garlic, grated

Peel and slice your Sussex beetroots, toss in Mesto olive oil with salt and pepper, and roast for approx. 30 minutes. Set aside.

Bed your plates with a generous serving of fiery, aromatic Sussex rocket and parsley. Equally scatter the radish, turnip, red onion, toasted nuts, apple, roasted beetroot and goat’s cheese in a visually pleasing manner.

For the dressing, simply combine the ingredients until well-mixed and pour equally over the salads.

Fancy some extra flair to brighten up your seasonal salad? Garnish with edible Sussex pansies and primroses! (And you’ve simply got to take a picture of it if you… @finandfarm).

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Image: beetroot & goats cheese salad by Michael Verhoef/ FLICKR (CC)

Sussex superfood salad – winter edition!

The Ultimate Sussex Spirit

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Are you looking for a heady, delicious, warming Christmas spirit? In search of a mouth-watering, unusual Xmas gift, perhaps?

Well, this Christmas, at Fin and Farm, we have just the thing for you!

Limited edition Sussex walnut liqueur.

Why is it limited edition?

This liqueur is small-batch made – not industrial! There simply won’t be any more of this aromatic Sussex spirit until next winter.

So – get it while it’s here!

What makes it so special?

It’s small-batch made in the beauty of the Sussex downs, using young walnuts, spices and pure vodka. But with an ABV of 17%, you won’t feel knocked out after dinner. Perfect!

Giving this as a gift? Great! You won’t find this beauty in the supermarket, so 10/10 for original and thoughtful gift giving…

Best ways to enjoy?

You’ll want to try this spirit straight to appreciate the unique walnut aroma. But, there are a million ways to enjoy this amber-hued spirit…

  • Pair with creamy blue cheese like Brighton Blue or Molecomb Blue for a savoury accompaniment at the festive table.
  • Sweet tooth? Pour over ice cream or douse some Xmas pud for a more indulgent treat.
  • Celebrating with cocktails? Instead of Amaretto or Frangelico, or to give an Old Fashioned a twist, use walnut liqueur.
  • Need an after-dinner digestif? Splash into coffee for an amped up espresso…

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Get yours HERE.

The Ultimate Sussex Spirit

Small-flock, hand-reared Christmas Turkeys

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Christmas is a special time of year – and only the best should be  gracing our plates!

Our highest welfare, small flock turkeys are just that. From a small Sussex farm, our birds are reared and treated to the highest standard of welfare (we have, of course, visited the farms and can certainly attest to this).

Bronze feathered and white feathered turkeys are reared, slowly and naturally, on a balanced cereal diet rich in oats – with NO growth promoting additives. This ensures a completely natural and richly flavoured meat.

Birds are processed from start to finish on the farm – meaning that they are hand plucked, dressed and dry-hung to ensure the highest quality welfare and meat. Traditional methods are used – and have been passed down on the family farm for generations.

Options:

Available as a whole turkey, as a turkey crown (legs can be supplied separately if wished) or boned and rolled. Simply choose your style and weight!

All turkeys are supplied boxed and with giblets. Stuffed turkeys are also available.

**Note: turkeys can be supplied in larger weights than we have on our site – however, as the birds are naturally reared, we won’t know for a couple of weeks what these will be!

Ordering:

You can order online. Or, if you prefer, speak to Nick (07966 972 530 or email nick@finandfarm.co.uk) and we can send you an invoice at a later date.

Browse turkeys today!  

 

 

Small-flock, hand-reared Christmas Turkeys

Parsnips are in! (Organic + biodynamic) 7 incredible ways to enjoy.

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Goodness, is it that time of year already?

Parsnips are here!

While they may seem to go hand-in-hand with Christmas in the British kitchen, there’re many ways to enjoy this comforting root veg. We’ve got a few ideas up our sleeve to keep them as a cool-season staple – not a once-a-year show.

From breakfast (really!) to dinner, parsnip’s wonderful earthy sweetness is one you simply need in your life.

Why?

Other than their palatability – parsnips are good for you.

This root veg is positively packed with essential minerals and phytonutrients to support your body. Parsnips are anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective and immune-enhancing.

Our locally grown, organic and bio-dynamic parsnips are positively bursting with health benefits.  Definitely a reason to include in our diets!

What are parsnips exactly?

Related to carrots, celery, celeriac, dill and parsley, parsnips are a root vegetable native to Europe. Spicy and sweet in flavour, parsnips have been a staple in our diets since roman times.

In the absence of honey and cane sugar, parsnips were the sweet treat in medieval England.

How? After the first frost, when parsnips are still in the ground, the starches change to sugar. (This is why Christmas parsnips taste so good roasted and caramelised…)

Fortunately for us, these days, we associate them as a savoury food. (Did you see our Sussex chocolate post?)

What happened to our love of parsnips?

Well – potatoes! Parsnips were pushed aside with the introduction of potatoes as a central source of starch in our diets.

But, today, there’s definitely room for both on our tables…

Tips:

  • Heavy, dense parsnips are the best. These are the freshest – and tastiest. Our parsnips are dug fresh from the earth and delivered straight away for maximum enjoyment.
  • Don’t peel! The skin is rich in nutrients – and flavour! Plus, our organic, bio-dynamic Sussex parsnips are pesticide-residue free. Just give ’em a good scrub!
  • Baby parsnips can be finely sliced or grated into salads. Very large parsnips can have their cores cut out before cooking for a sweeter taste.

And now for the good part…

Ways to enjoy:

1. Breakfast

Parsnips are delicious any time of day. Breakfast is no exception! Try a creamy, sweet spiced parsnip porridge (honestly, it’s exquisite).

More savoury than sweet tooth? (Or perhaps just not up for the idea of parsnip porridge…). Parsnip hash-browns are a breakfast must. Or, how about a chicken and parsnip breakfast bake to keep you going…

2. Salads

I know. It’s hardly the weather to have you craving a salad. But, keep it seasonal and cool-weather salads will be a flavoursome delight.

Autumn parsnip and chestnut salad is about as seasonal (and delicious) as you can get. This parsnip, blue cheese and hazelnut salad will have you salivating.

Parsnips will add a whole new dimension of deliciousness to your leaves!

3. Soup

Naturally creamy and comforting, you can dig in with some fresh crusty bread and cool, salted Sussex butter after a brisk walk in the cool wintery air.

Sound appetizing? Parsnip is perfect in this farmer’s market soup. Or, how about parsnip, almond and garlic soup for a creamy, flavoursome and wholesome boost.

4. Curries and stews

Spices and slow cooking truly do this humble root veg justice. Parsnip and chickpea curry will transform the way you view this root veg, while this jungle curry  is a bowl of wintery, spiced goodness.

5. Roast

Roasting caramelises this root to utter perfection. You can simply slice and cover with oil and spices for a fuss-free side. Or, take note from Jamie Oliver on the perfect way to roast.

Our suggestion? Enjoy in the ultimate comforting way: Parmesan baked parsnips. (So, so moreish…)

6. Stock

Want to create the most delicious food you’ve ever cooked in your life?

Homemade stock is the answer! You’ll wonder how a stock cube could ever compare…

There’s no limit to what you can put in. Simply slowly simmer veg, fresh herbs and seasoning of choice. Sieve the liquid from the main ingredients once cooked, and use immediately or freeze for the future.

Aromatic and sweet parsnips are the key to creating an intense stock.  Here’s a recipe for inspiration (plus how to make your own stock powder).

7. Cake

Surprising, I know. But it may just be one of the most delicious things you’ll eat. Flavoursome and dense in texture, carrots can step aside and let parsnips steal the cake show for once.

Here’s an inviting recipe for parsnip and maple syrup cake. Or how about Scandinavian spiced parsnip cake? Mmm, or zesty orange and ginger parsnip cake

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Feeling inspired?

Get your Sussex parsnips today!

Did you try any of these recipes? How do you like to eat and cook parsnips? Let us know! (@finandfarm)


Image: Parsnip Cake 7 by jules/ Flickr (CC)

Parsnips are in! (Organic + biodynamic) 7 incredible ways to enjoy.

#EatSussex Tomatoes: Our Favourite Way!

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So, you’ve probably heard already.

But – in case you haven’t – it’s the final week of the year to order mouth-watering Sussex tomatoes. The. Final. Week.

It may be heart-breaking to say goodbye to summer for good (it’s really real when there’re no more tomatoes to enjoy…) but we’ve got a whole load of incredible autumnal produce to dig into…

In the meantime, though, let’s go a little tomato crazy.

After all – it’s a whole year before they’re this good again. Everyone we asked said tomatoes were their favourite produce this summer – and with good reason!

So, we’re sharing out favourite tomato recipe from the #EatSussex summer. Share your favourites and spread the beauty of local tomato enjoyment… (@finandfarm)

#EatSussex Bruschetta

This recipe was recommended to me by an Italian friend. Simple, easy, delicious – it’s truly the way to enjoy good quality.

You’ll need:
A generous handful of mouth-watering Sussex tomatoes (any variety you like)
1 clove of garlic
Fresh oregano or basil
Seasoning
Mesto olive oil
Freshly baked bread
Curly Sussex parsley to season

Method:
Finely dice the tomatoes and place in a bowl. Crush the garlic, tear up your chosen herbs and add to the bowl. Season well and generously drizzle with Mesto olive oil.

Let the tomatoes sit and combine with the flavours for 20 minutes or so. Once combined, grill or toast your homemade bread. Top with the tomato mixture and enjoy! Garnish with parsley and little extra olive oil if desired…

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How do you love to enjoy fine quality, delicious Sussex tomatoes? Let us know in the comments, on facebook, twitter or IG.

#EatSussex Tomatoes: Our Favourite Way!

Purple Potatoes: What’s the Deal?

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Potatoes comes in many, many varieties – much more than a glance of a British supermarket would have you believe. But none could be more distinct than the Vitelotte. With it’s deep purple-black skin and bright blue-violet flesh, this potato has a stunning vivid colour, and distinctive, chestnutty taste.

What makes them purple?

Purple potatoes are packed full of anti-oxidants – and, primarily, the anti-oxidant ‘anthocyanin’, the flavinoid that gives red, purple and blue fruits and vegetables their distinctive colour. Revered for both it’s use as a dye and for it’s health promoting benefits, purple-hued plants have been cultivated for thousands of years for this wonderful antioxidant.

Did you know that purple produce was one of the predicted trends for 2017? With the health and wellness movement taking the world by storm – we’re not surprised! (Plus, purple foods are delicious…)

Why is this so good?

Antioxidants are essential to counter the effects of oxidants (i.e. ‘free-radicals’) in the body. In an antioxidant scarce diet, oxidants are free to cause cell damage, increase inflammation and contributing to disease progression. Purple potatoes, fortunately, have much more than antioxidants than their paler potato cousins – hence the vivid hue.

Anthocyanins are, in fact, antioxidant superheroes and are a potent force of health in the body, as demonstrated by a plethora of in-vitro and participant studies. For example, one study found that adding purple potatoes to the diets of overweight, middle aged subjects reduced their blood pressure by five points within a month. Just by adding potatoes! (And who doesn’t love the idea of eating more potatoes for health?) And, the purple cherry on top: despite the calorie increase, none of the subjects gained any weight. Purple potatoes truly are superior…

What to do with them?

Purple potatoes definitely taste different to your usual supermarket yellow and white varieties – and that’s a good thing! With their nutty taste and magnificent colour (even when cooked), you can use these delicious potatoes in any potato recipe you desire for a twist. Whip up a salad and add vitelottes for a striking visual element; slice, drizzle with olive oil and herbs and roast for some truly spectacular and flavoursome french fries, or how about this recipe for a striking autumn gratin?

Recipe:

You’ll need:
5 medium vitelotte potatoes, sliced
1 festival squash, peeled and cubed.
1 leek , sliced
A generous bunch of spinach
A handful of sage
A handful of thyme
4 cloves of garlic, crushed
1 good tsp black pepper
1 cup of Sussex cream
5 oz Sister Sarah cheese

Method:
Preheat the oven to 180c. In a baking dish, layer the leeks, spinach, squash and potatoes, finishing with a layer of purple potatoes for the top layer. Sprinkle each layer with garlic, herbs and pepper. When layered, pour over the cream and top with the Sister Sarah cheese.

Cover with foil and bake for about an hour and half – or until the potatoes and squash are cooked.

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Want to try some interesting, unusual and downright delicious potato varieties, grown in Sussex? Take a look at our range now! 

Have you tried vitelotte potatoes? What do you think? What’s your favourite heritage potato? Let us know in the comments or on our social media! (@finandfarm)


Recipe inspired by Autumn Potato Gratin by Better Homes and Gardens.
Image 1: Luscious Potato Plant Flowers by Laura Ferreira/ Flickr (CC)
Image 2: Purple Peruvian Potatoes by Pim Techamuanvivit/ Flickr (CC)

Purple Potatoes: What’s the Deal?