What is biodynamic?

brassicass.png

If you’re a little hazy about just what biodynamic is, you’d be forgiven. Is it organic? Something to do with the lunar cycles?

Just what?

Well, we delved into biodynamic research to bring you the answers…

What is biodynamic?

In a nutshell:

It’s a growing methodology that promotes harmony with nature, healthful crops and biodiversity.

A little more detailed: 

It’s a holistic, ethical approach to agriculture pioneered by Rudolph Steiner in the 1920s in reaction to the industrialisation of agricultural practices.

Steiner was alarmed at the increasing devastation of topsoil health with the introduction of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. The quality of produce and livestock were affected, and the long term sustainability and benefit of intensive farming methods were called into question.

In Steiner’s philosophy, the farm is a living organism. All components must operate in a harmonious and self-sufficient manner. The name ‘Biodynamic’ comes from two Greek words: bios meaning life, and dynamos meaning energy. Makes sense, right?

How do biodynamic farms achieve this?

Through crop rotation, biodynamic composting preparations and a prohibition of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides.

It’s one of the most successful and sustainable forms of organic agriculture today! And – truly – it’s the polar opposite of conventional farming methods where profits are prioritised over planetary health.

Steiner was a  proponent of certain spiritual and homeopathic methods (such as following a lunar cycle and using herbal and animal preparations in composting). While this is scoffed at, for many growers, a personal connection with their land is essential. If you’ve ever tended to your own piece of land, you have an idea of just how deep a connection goes! Plus, biodynamic herbal compost preparations contain the nutrients and chemical composition needed for healthy soil for plants to thrive in.

Why is it better than conventional farming practices?

Topsoil is precious. It’s the reason we have food to eat. It’s the reason we can exist.

There is, however, a limited amount of topsoil to feed, well – everyone.

Biodynamic farms hold a powerful stance in a corporate world that prioritises agribusinesses, where intensive farming practices leave this soil depleted of essential nutrients.

Biodynamic yield will probably never feed the masses as crop yield will never match those of industrial farms. But, with the philosophy feed your neighbor (or, the Sussex community), you can do a pretty good job…

So, is it ‘organic’?

Yes! Biodynamic food is organic – plus more.

Synthetic fertilizers and pesticides are prohibited in biodynamic farms. And, while organic certified produce allows the use of organic imported fertilisers, biodynamic growing methods require a farm to produce its own fertility, through composting and crop rotation.

Whatsmore, 10% of a biodynamic farm acreage must be set aside for the sole purpose of biodiversity!

What do we think is the best benefit here at Fin and Farm?

The best thing? The taste and quality of produce – it’s like homegrown! Rich and healthy soil does have definite impact…

What biodynamic veg do we have right now at Fin and Farm?

Right now, we’ve got a whole array of incredible, beautiful biodynamic veg on offer!

You can find: basil, chards, bramley apples, squashes (many), kales, spinach, sorrel, potatoes, candy beetroot, jerusalem artichokes, leeks, onions and parsnips!  


What do you think? Let us know in the comments, or on twitter, facebook or instagram! (@finandfarm)

Advertisements
What is biodynamic?

Parsnips are in! (Organic + biodynamic) 7 incredible ways to enjoy.

PARSNIPP.jpg

Goodness, is it that time of year already?

Parsnips are here!

While they may seem to go hand-in-hand with Christmas in the British kitchen, there’re many ways to enjoy this comforting root veg. We’ve got a few ideas up our sleeve to keep them as a cool-season staple – not a once-a-year show.

From breakfast (really!) to dinner, parsnip’s wonderful earthy sweetness is one you simply need in your life.

Why?

Other than their palatability – parsnips are good for you.

This root veg is positively packed with essential minerals and phytonutrients to support your body. Parsnips are anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective and immune-enhancing.

Our locally grown, organic and bio-dynamic parsnips are positively bursting with health benefits.  Definitely a reason to include in our diets!

What are parsnips exactly?

Related to carrots, celery, celeriac, dill and parsley, parsnips are a root vegetable native to Europe. Spicy and sweet in flavour, parsnips have been a staple in our diets since roman times.

In the absence of honey and cane sugar, parsnips were the sweet treat in medieval England.

How? After the first frost, when parsnips are still in the ground, the starches change to sugar. (This is why Christmas parsnips taste so good roasted and caramelised…)

Fortunately for us, these days, we associate them as a savoury food. (Did you see our Sussex chocolate post?)

What happened to our love of parsnips?

Well – potatoes! Parsnips were pushed aside with the introduction of potatoes as a central source of starch in our diets.

But, today, there’s definitely room for both on our tables…

Tips:

  • Heavy, dense parsnips are the best. These are the freshest – and tastiest. Our parsnips are dug fresh from the earth and delivered straight away for maximum enjoyment.
  • Don’t peel! The skin is rich in nutrients – and flavour! Plus, our organic, bio-dynamic Sussex parsnips are pesticide-residue free. Just give ’em a good scrub!
  • Baby parsnips can be finely sliced or grated into salads. Very large parsnips can have their cores cut out before cooking for a sweeter taste.

And now for the good part…

Ways to enjoy:

1. Breakfast

Parsnips are delicious any time of day. Breakfast is no exception! Try a creamy, sweet spiced parsnip porridge (honestly, it’s exquisite).

More savoury than sweet tooth? (Or perhaps just not up for the idea of parsnip porridge…). Parsnip hash-browns are a breakfast must. Or, how about a chicken and parsnip breakfast bake to keep you going…

2. Salads

I know. It’s hardly the weather to have you craving a salad. But, keep it seasonal and cool-weather salads will be a flavoursome delight.

Autumn parsnip and chestnut salad is about as seasonal (and delicious) as you can get. This parsnip, blue cheese and hazelnut salad will have you salivating.

Parsnips will add a whole new dimension of deliciousness to your leaves!

3. Soup

Naturally creamy and comforting, you can dig in with some fresh crusty bread and cool, salted Sussex butter after a brisk walk in the cool wintery air.

Sound appetizing? Parsnip is perfect in this farmer’s market soup. Or, how about parsnip, almond and garlic soup for a creamy, flavoursome and wholesome boost.

4. Curries and stews

Spices and slow cooking truly do this humble root veg justice. Parsnip and chickpea curry will transform the way you view this root veg, while this jungle curry  is a bowl of wintery, spiced goodness.

5. Roast

Roasting caramelises this root to utter perfection. You can simply slice and cover with oil and spices for a fuss-free side. Or, take note from Jamie Oliver on the perfect way to roast.

Our suggestion? Enjoy in the ultimate comforting way: Parmesan baked parsnips. (So, so moreish…)

6. Stock

Want to create the most delicious food you’ve ever cooked in your life?

Homemade stock is the answer! You’ll wonder how a stock cube could ever compare…

There’s no limit to what you can put in. Simply slowly simmer veg, fresh herbs and seasoning of choice. Sieve the liquid from the main ingredients once cooked, and use immediately or freeze for the future.

Aromatic and sweet parsnips are the key to creating an intense stock.  Here’s a recipe for inspiration (plus how to make your own stock powder).

7. Cake

Surprising, I know. But it may just be one of the most delicious things you’ll eat. Flavoursome and dense in texture, carrots can step aside and let parsnips steal the cake show for once.

Here’s an inviting recipe for parsnip and maple syrup cake. Or how about Scandinavian spiced parsnip cake? Mmm, or zesty orange and ginger parsnip cake

parsnipcake
Feeling inspired?

Get your Sussex parsnips today!

Did you try any of these recipes? How do you like to eat and cook parsnips? Let us know! (@finandfarm)


Image: Parsnip Cake 7 by jules/ Flickr (CC)

Parsnips are in! (Organic + biodynamic) 7 incredible ways to enjoy.

#EatSussex Tomatoes: Our Favourite Way!

1tom

So, you’ve probably heard already.

But – in case you haven’t – it’s the final week of the year to order mouth-watering Sussex tomatoes. The. Final. Week.

It may be heart-breaking to say goodbye to summer for good (it’s really real when there’re no more tomatoes to enjoy…) but we’ve got a whole load of incredible autumnal produce to dig into…

In the meantime, though, let’s go a little tomato crazy.

After all – it’s a whole year before they’re this good again. Everyone we asked said tomatoes were their favourite produce this summer – and with good reason!

So, we’re sharing out favourite tomato recipe from the #EatSussex summer. Share your favourites and spread the beauty of local tomato enjoyment… (@finandfarm)

#EatSussex Bruschetta

This recipe was recommended to me by an Italian friend. Simple, easy, delicious – it’s truly the way to enjoy good quality.

You’ll need:
A generous handful of mouth-watering Sussex tomatoes (any variety you like)
1 clove of garlic
Fresh oregano or basil
Seasoning
Mesto olive oil
Freshly baked bread
Curly Sussex parsley to season

Method:
Finely dice the tomatoes and place in a bowl. Crush the garlic, tear up your chosen herbs and add to the bowl. Season well and generously drizzle with Mesto olive oil.

Let the tomatoes sit and combine with the flavours for 20 minutes or so. Once combined, grill or toast your homemade bread. Top with the tomato mixture and enjoy! Garnish with parsley and little extra olive oil if desired…

3tom


How do you love to enjoy fine quality, delicious Sussex tomatoes? Let us know in the comments, on facebook, twitter or IG.

#EatSussex Tomatoes: Our Favourite Way!

3 Delicious and Wholesome Ways to Enjoy Autumn Apples (other than straight from the tree)

Want a sweet but wholesome treat? We’ve got just the thing for you!

It’s the time of year to enjoy apples. Truly – they won’t taste as good as they do now. Local, fresh, heritage and bursting with flavour, our Sussex apples are the best of the bunch.

We’ve got a plethora of varieties to choose from this season – so take your pick! Charles Ross, Lord Lambourne, Laxton Fortune... have you even heard of these before? Granny Smith can take a backseat and let Limelight steal the… well, limelight.

So don’t miss out! Here’s three scrumptious and wholesome ways to enjoy apples this October:

1. Apple-Almond Breakfast Bread

Get a healthy and thoroughly delicious Sussex start to the day with this apple-almond breakfast bread…

You’ll need:
5 Sussex apples
3 free-range Sussex eggs
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp of organic, unwaxed lemon zest
70g ground almonds
2 cups of wholemeal flour
1/4 cup Mesto olive oil
1/4 cup of Sussex raw runny honey
2 tsp baking powder
1 apple, sliced, a drizzle of honey and slivered almonds to garnish.

Method:
Preheat the oven to 180c.  Finely cop the apples and place in a food processor with eggs, spices, lemon zest, oil, sweetener, flour, almonds and baking powder. Blitz until very well combined.

Pour the mixture into a lined baking tin and even out. Place the sliced apples, slivered almonds and a drizzle of extra sweetener on top. Bake for approx. 50 minutes or until golden and a skewer comes out clean.

Enjoy for breakfast with fresh fruit, yogurt and nut butter for a wholesome start to the day!

APPPP

Recipe adapted from My Lovely Little Lunch Box

2. Cinnamon Comfort Apples

This seasonal skillet apple recipe is a fabulous way to easily enjoy the tart sweetness of cooking apples, while also offering you a wholesome dessert.

 You’ll need:
1 tsp butter
2 Sussex organic bramley apples, sliced or diced.
1 tbsp raw Sussex borage honey
2 tsp cinnamon
1 pinch of organic, unwaxed lemon zest
80g of slivered roasted almonds or roasted crushed hazelnuts
Water or autumnal elderberry liqueur.
Creamy yogurt and honey to serve.

Method:
In a skillet, heat the butter, and add in the honey, zest and cinnamon. Throw in the apples (and a little water/ a splash of autumnal liqueur to help cook) and simmer until soft, stirring regularly.

When soft and fragrant, place onto beautiful serving plates. Top with a serving of toasted nuts, and generous dollop of yogurt, and a swirl of raw honey if desired!

APPP

3. The Ultimate Apple Pick-Me-Up

Whether on the go, or need an energy boost, this recipe is the ultimate and easiest way to get in that Sussex apple goodness (other than just eating an apple, that is…). Yep, a Sussex apple smoothie!

You’ll need:
1 cup of Sussex hemp milk
1-2 Sussex green Limelight apples
2-3 tbsp of creamy Sussex yogurt
2 tbsp oats
1 tsp raw Sussex honey
A pinch of cinnamon
A few ice cubes
(Sussex matcha – optional)

Method:
In a blender, combine the ingredients and pulse until smooth and creamy. Throw in 1/2 tsp of matcha for a superfood boost. Enjoy immediately for the most enjoyment!

SMOOTH

How do you like to eat and cook your autumn apples? Let us know in the comments! Tag us in all of your Sussex apple social media posts… (@finandfarm)


Image 1: Basket of Apples by Mathias Erhart/ Flickr (CC) Image 2:  Fresh Apple Cake Slice 2 by Jessica and Lon Binder/ Flickr (CC)/ Image 3: making apple filling by yoppy/ Flickr (CC)/ Image 4: pre-Strength stills by Yum Evoke/ Flickr (CC)

3 Delicious and Wholesome Ways to Enjoy Autumn Apples (other than straight from the tree)

More than Maris Peer: a brief heritage potato guide

pots

Love potatoes? These South America native tubers have been growing and enjoyed in Britain since 1586. They’ve lifted Western Europe out of famine, allowing the populations to prosper well into the 20th century. This delicious tuber is positively a part of our heritage!

There are over 5,000 potato varieties worldwide, and 3,000 of which are only found in Peru. In the UK and across Europe, hundreds of years of enjoyment have led to an  incredible, array of beautiful and mouth-watering varieties. British supermarkets, however, may lead you to believe otherwise…

Ever been in a supermarket and only found Maris Peer? That’s definitely enough to kill your enthusiasm for a potato dinner…

So, what happened to heritage?

In the first half of the twentieth century, heritage potatoes were grown, loved and cooked in households across the UK. But after the second world war, a devastated country was pressured to bypass the growing of potatoes for delicious nuances. The goal was, instead, to feed a hungry country. Crops were prized for their yield rather than colour and flavour. As commercialism took over and supermarkets began their reign, profit over produce became the commercial mantra.

Why are heritage varieties so good?

With modern breeding practices aiming to make the potato as profitable and uniform as possible, the charm and palatability found in many heritage varieties is by-passed. Heritage potatoes, therefore, are often found with colours, shapes, sizes and textures  missing from their commercial cousins. Hmm, no wonder heritage potatoes are so prized! But, with their shorter growing seasons, enjoy heritage potatoes while they’re here…

 

POTAD
A 1960s potato advert – when there was still more variety commercially!

Waxy ←→ Floury

From waxy to floury, potatoes come in a spectrum of textures. These texture make certain varieties suited to particular dishes and styles of cooking, so it’s always good to know the texture of the variety your buying. Floury potatoes have a high starch content and low water content, with a dry texture that falls apart easily and soaks up flavour. Waxy potatoes are so for their low starch and high water content that can be intense in flavour but not soak up any additional flavours so well. All-purpose fall somewhere in-between.

But, waxy or floury, our heritage potatoes are always delicious. (Move over Maris Peer…)

A QUICK FIN & FARM POTATO A-V. 

Arran Victory 1918arranvic

Bred on Scotland’s seventh largest (and very beautiful) island, the Arran Victory 1918 was created to mark the end of World War One. Round in shape, and with deep blue-pink skin and white fluffy flesh, this potato makes the perfect mash, pie topping or a delicious bake.

Highland Burgundy Red 1936

This red skinned, red fleshed potato was bred to add a shock of colour to the meals of the Duke of Burgundy. Long oval in shape, sweet in flavour and floury in texture, Highland Burgundy Reds are excellent for striking roast potatoes, chips, crisps and baked potatoes. Keep the skin on to better retain colour!

Inca Belle 

INCABELLAFrom a variety of potato still popular today in the Andes, the Inca Belle is a beautifully golden, oval potato. It’s nutty flavour, smooth flesh and unique cooking properties (it’ll cook much quicker than the varieties you’re probably used to!) make it a cook’s favourite. Best for roasting – hands down as we did the heritage roast test ourselves!

Mayan Gold

The first potatoes in the UK bred from the indigenous Phureja potatoes of Peru, this beautiful variety is a real treat to experience. With golden flesh and skin, a wonderfully moreish flavour, and fluffy texture, this potato is perfect for roasting, mashing and baking. 

Mayan Twilight

With pink and white skin, firm waxy texture and moreish flavour, this quick to cook potato is a treat in the kitchen. Best for salads and stews with it’s slightly sweet, nutty flavour and smooth texture.

Pink Gypsy

With pink and white skins and fluffy white flesh, these beauties are ideal for roasting, baking and mashing. 

Red Duke of York

Originally found in a Dutch crop of classic Duke of Yorks, this potato quickly became popular. With fluffy, creamy flesh, sweet taste and gorgeously red-hued skin, this heritage potato is a fabulous all-rounder. However, these beauties are perfect for roasting as they get deliciously crispy skins.  

Shetland Black

With light buttery, sweet flesh and floury texture, this indigo skinned potato is a ktichen delight. While the origin of this particular variety is a mystery, it’s been grown in the Shetland Islands since at least the early 1900s. Bake the shetland black whole, in it’s skin, for warming, crisp potato deliciousness.

Violetta

violetta

These small, flavourful potatoes have a deep indigo skin and and intensely purple flesh. They are, visually, perhaps the most striking potato we’ve seen here at Fin and Farm. With a floury texture, it’s best to leave the skin on these potatoes to help retain colour when cooking (plus, it’s tasty and more nutritious!). Best for roasting, baking and mashing for an eye catching twist on some classics!

**not an extensive list of our potatoes! Explore varieties here.**

A Potato Experiment

While these potatoes have their ‘best for’ uses as determined by how floury or waxy they are – don’t be afraid to experiment! Small, waxy potatoes can be delicious roasted whole for intense, crisp flavour bites, thrown into stews, or crushed with oil, herbs and garlic. These wonderful potatoes deserve to be enjoyed any way you like – so let us know what you think each variety is best for and what you’ve been cooking with them!

Bonus! Did you know…?

The potato certainly caused a stir when first introduced to this part of the world, and was treated, at first, with a mix of love and fear. Over in North America, during the gold rush when nutritious food was scarce and gold abundant, there was a time when potatoes were worth more than gold!


Image 1: New Spuds  for Dinner by cskk/ Flickr (CC). Image 2: 1967 Food Ad, Campbell’s Potatoes by Classic Film/Flickr (CC).

More than Maris Peer: a brief heritage potato guide

Purple Potatoes: What’s the Deal?

puro3-e1508410361203.png

Potatoes comes in many, many varieties – much more than a glance of a British supermarket would have you believe. But none could be more distinct than the Vitelotte. With it’s deep purple-black skin and bright blue-violet flesh, this potato has a stunning vivid colour, and distinctive, chestnutty taste.

What makes them purple?

Purple potatoes are packed full of anti-oxidants – and, primarily, the anti-oxidant ‘anthocyanin’, the flavinoid that gives red, purple and blue fruits and vegetables their distinctive colour. Revered for both it’s use as a dye and for it’s health promoting benefits, purple-hued plants have been cultivated for thousands of years for this wonderful antioxidant.

Did you know that purple produce was one of the predicted trends for 2017? With the health and wellness movement taking the world by storm – we’re not surprised! (Plus, purple foods are delicious…)

Why is this so good?

Antioxidants are essential to counter the effects of oxidants (i.e. ‘free-radicals’) in the body. In an antioxidant scarce diet, oxidants are free to cause cell damage, increase inflammation and contributing to disease progression. Purple potatoes, fortunately, have much more than antioxidants than their paler potato cousins – hence the vivid hue.

Anthocyanins are, in fact, antioxidant superheroes and are a potent force of health in the body, as demonstrated by a plethora of in-vitro and participant studies. For example, one study found that adding purple potatoes to the diets of overweight, middle aged subjects reduced their blood pressure by five points within a month. Just by adding potatoes! (And who doesn’t love the idea of eating more potatoes for health?) And, the purple cherry on top: despite the calorie increase, none of the subjects gained any weight. Purple potatoes truly are superior…

What to do with them?

Purple potatoes definitely taste different to your usual supermarket yellow and white varieties – and that’s a good thing! With their nutty taste and magnificent colour (even when cooked), you can use these delicious potatoes in any potato recipe you desire for a twist. Whip up a salad and add vitelottes for a striking visual element; slice, drizzle with olive oil and herbs and roast for some truly spectacular and flavoursome french fries, or how about this recipe for a striking autumn gratin?

Recipe:

You’ll need:
5 medium vitelotte potatoes, sliced
1 festival squash, peeled and cubed.
1 leek , sliced
A generous bunch of spinach
A handful of sage
A handful of thyme
4 cloves of garlic, crushed
1 good tsp black pepper
1 cup of Sussex cream
5 oz Sister Sarah cheese

Method:
Preheat the oven to 180c. In a baking dish, layer the leeks, spinach, squash and potatoes, finishing with a layer of purple potatoes for the top layer. Sprinkle each layer with garlic, herbs and pepper. When layered, pour over the cream and top with the Sister Sarah cheese.

Cover with foil and bake for about an hour and half – or until the potatoes and squash are cooked.

purp1

Want to try some interesting, unusual and downright delicious potato varieties, grown in Sussex? Take a look at our range now! 

Have you tried vitelotte potatoes? What do you think? What’s your favourite heritage potato? Let us know in the comments or on our social media! (@finandfarm)


Recipe inspired by Autumn Potato Gratin by Better Homes and Gardens.
Image 1: Luscious Potato Plant Flowers by Laura Ferreira/ Flickr (CC)
Image 2: Purple Peruvian Potatoes by Pim Techamuanvivit/ Flickr (CC)

Purple Potatoes: What’s the Deal?

Sweet Chestnuts!

chestnut.png

Often scarce on the supermarket shelves (except at Christmas), Chestnuts can leave us a little perplexed with just what to do with them. But chestnuts have populated the British Isles since Roman times – and positively flourish in the South of England. We may associate them with Christmas, but chestnut season is here, and these delicious fruits deserve to be enjoyed!

chestn.png

A true seasonal delight, chestnuts are sweet, complex and richly flavoured. Their comforting starchy texture is wonderfully versatile for cooking. Whether sweet or savoury, chestnuts can be as wholesome or as decadent as you like. Mmm, it’s time to reintroduce the chestnut back into our culinary know-how…

How to cook

Chestnuts need cooking to become palatable. If you’ve cooked chestnuts before, then you can certainly attest to the rich, aromatic flavour cooking brings out. You can boil (approx. 30 minutes), microwave (approx. 3-4 minutes) or roast (approx. 30 minutes) – just be sure to score an X or line into the bottom of the shell to allow for peeling and to stop them from ‘exploding’! Cooking them in an open flame winter fire is, perhaps, one of the most loved ways to eat chestnuts in this country.

No matter how you’re cooking them, be sure to peel chestnuts when they’re still warm. When they’ve cooled, this can feel like the impossible task!

How to eat

There are a myriad of possibilities when it comes to enjoying chestnuts.  Blitz in a food processor to make chestnut flour – a healthy, gluten-free alternative with a slightly nutty flavour. Puree to fill a dessert such as the renowned French Buche de Noel (chocolate log filled with chestnut puree – yum!) or as a mashed potato alternative. Throw into roasts for texture and taste, or, add to rustic soups and stews to infinitely enhance with an earthy, sweet flavour.

Recipe

Decadent Chocolate-Chestnut Torte

We may associate chestnuts with Christmas and open fires, but chocolate and chestnut might just be the most heavenly combination. Haven’t tried it yet? Well, we’ve got a recipe that’ll make your mouth water…

Gluten-free, deeply chocolatey and enhanced with the flavour of pureed chestnuts and enticing walnut liqueur, this cake won’t fail to please.

You’ll need:
450g chestnut puree
230g dark chocolate
6 eggs
125g butter
65g sugar
2 tablespoons walnut liqueur

To serve:
Cream (as desired)
50g dark chocolate

Method:
Preheat the oven to 180C. In a mixing bowl, whisk the egg whites until firm (but not quite meringue texture). Melt the dark chocolate over a bowl of boiling water.

In a food processor, combine the butter, sugar and chestnut puree. Add in the egg yolks, liqueur and dark chocolate and combine.

In a mixing bowl, gradually fold through the whisked egg whites. Pour into a baking tin and cook for approx 40 minutes in the oven. Allow to cool before enjoying with whipped cream and chocolate shavings (and possibly an extra shot of walnut liqueur)!

torte

Order your chestnuts today!

Let us know in the comments how you like to enjoy this seasonal delicacy..


Recipe adapted from Nigella Lawson Chocolate Chestnut Cake (gluten free)  
Image 1: Chestnuts by Kristian Mollenborg/flikr (CC)
Image 2: Chestnuts by Simone Piunno/flickr (CC)
Image 3: dark chocolate torte by kylesteed/flickr (CC)

Sweet Chestnuts!