Elderflower Cordial – Feels Like Spring

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It’s not quite the season to make your own cordial yet – but there’s no reason why you can’t bring some Spring flavour into your drinks and cooking.

The Freshness of Bentley’s Elderflower Cordial

Ringden Farm has been harvesting apples and making their award winning juices for over 50 years.  It’s currently managed by Chris Dench and his son John and Bentley’s is their new juice dedicated to Bentley Dench who originally established the farm.

Elderflower

Bentley’s Elderflower Cordial is made by our expert juicers at Ringden Farm in Sussex.  The elderflowers are picked locally and the cordial is gently pasteurised in the bottle so the freshness can still shine through.  No chemical flavourings or synthetic additives.

Bottled as a potent double strength, the diminutive bottle will last a while. Continue reading “Elderflower Cordial – Feels Like Spring”

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Elderflower Cordial – Feels Like Spring

Raw Cider Vinegar – Your Kitchen Hero

Cidervinegar

For centuries, cider vinegar has been a household staple for cooking, cleaning and medicinal needs.  It’s been a beauty product and all round essential…treated for itchy eczema to shiny hair.

Professional chefs also have also been known to keep a bottle at hand as seasoning in soups, stews or puddings and vinaigrettes.

It’s generally acknowledged that raw cider vinegar has the most potent effect.  Our cider vinegar has travelled just 30 miles from Ringden Farm, on the Kent/Sussex border, where they make Yellowcoate Raw Cider Vinegar with Mother.

‘With Mother’ is the slightly peculiar term for unfiltered cider vinegar which is in its natural state. Cheaper pasteurised vinegars are made quickly and filtered to be crystal clear, removing all the beneficial living enzymes.


Why is it healthy?

‘An apple a day keeps the doctor away’ – we all know the expression and that it’s based on the fact that apples are rich in vitamins, minerals, fibre and pectin and are our homegrown superfood.


Cooking with Cider Vinegar

  • An alternative to barbecue sauce is the smoky, intense bacon jam recipe.  Smother liberally on homemade burgers or alongside charcuterie or blue cheese.

baconjam

  • Cider vinegar intensifies the sweet and fiery flavour in this Horseradish Cream.
  • Add intensity to an apple crumble:  melt butter in a pan and gently cook the apples until golden.  Add a splash of cider vinegar and gently cook til soft.  Add a crumble topping and bake as usual.
  • A gorgeous cider apple vinegar and honey vinaigrette for healthy salads.  Use raw honey as well as raw cider vinegar for extra health benefits.
  • Add a tablespoon of cider vinegar to the cooking water when boiling eggs.  It will help stop the shells from breaking and the whites frothing out.
  • Marinating meat in cider vinegar helps tenderise the meat and apparently kills bacteria.  In 175ml of vinegar add marinating spices and herbs.  Rest the meat in the mixture overnight or for at least a few hours.
  • Apparently, apple cider vinegar is a useful vegan substitute for eggs in baking.  We haven’t tried this but will do so and update you on the progress.  Use 1 tablespoon of cider vinegar for each egg.
  • The acidic properties of cider vinegar makes it a perfect substitute for lemon juice.
  • When peeling apples, use a dash of cider vinegar in water to drop the apples into to prevent them turning brown til you cook with them.
  • Add a spoonful of cider vinegar to boiling vegetables helps retain the colour.
  • Add a spoonful of cider vinegar to the washing water for veg as the acidity helps kill bacteria.

Health and Beauty uses

  • Make your hair shine. Fill an old shampoo bottle with half a tablespoon of cider vinegar and 250ml of filtered water.  Pour the solution through your hair after shampooing.  Do this every wash for best results.
  • Raw cider vinegar can regulate the pH of your skin. Dilute the vinegar with two parts water and dab over your face to replace toner at night and in the morning before applying moisturiser.
  • Apparently a dab of cider vinegar on the skin at night can help fade age spots and acne scars.
  • For warts, soak a cotton ball in raw cider vinegar then fasten to the wart with a plaster. The skin might swell a little as it reacts but the wart should fall off.  Once it has disappeared, continue the vinegar/plaster treatment to make sure it doesn’t return.
  • Keep the pearly whites clean and remove red wine or coffee staining by rubbing with cider vinegar and rinsing.
  • Apparently adding 250ml of cider vinegar to a cool bath and soaking for ten minutes can help the discomfort of sunburn.
  • Tired feet can be revived with a massage of cider vinegar.
  • Apparently, mixing 2 teaspoons of raw cider vinegar with 500ml water and sipping throughout the day is a powerful detox drink.  Studies have suggested it boosts circulation and help detoxify the liver.  Furthermore, it regulates the body’s pH which helps maintain the ideal alkaline balance for fighting infection.
  • Research also suggests that cider vinegar can help with allergies because of its ability to reduce mucus and congestion.  Again, a powerful mixture of cider vinegar and raw honey is suggested to help hayfever.
  • Natural remedy experts suggest that a teaspoon of cider vinegar followed by a glass of water can relieve heartburn.  Seems strange but cider vinegar boosts alkalinity.  NB. this would not be recommended if have a stomach ulcer.
  • Sipping the water/vinegar mix is also reputed to relieve symptoms of yeast overload such as thrush or candida which can lead to sugar cravings, poor memory or fatigue.
  • There are loads of ways to use raw cider vinegar to treat fungal nail in this post here from home remedies for life.

Around the house

  • Cider vinegar is a wonderful natural cleaner and leaves your rooms smelling of apples.  Pour cider vinegar into the toilet and leave it overnight.  You can also mix 1 part vinegar to two parts water and use as a multi-surface cleaner or cleaner for mirrors and windows.
  • It is also reputed to help repel dog fleas.  Use the one part vinegar and one part water solution and spray onto the pet’s fur (avoiding their eyes).  Be generous with the mixture and continue every few days to get rid of a flea infestation.  However, it won’t treat carpets or furnishings but is a good natural treatment for your pet.
  • Use a spot of vinegar on a cloth to clean your keyboard.  It cleans them, helps kill bacteria and leaves them shiny.
  • Clean your kettle by boiling 750ml of vinegar for 5 minutes then let sit overnight.  Rinse in the morning before anyone accidentally uses the water.
  • Clean water stained furniture with cider vinegar to remove.
  • Clean scissors with vinegar not water, which can lead to rust.
  • Use instead of bleach on mildew around the bath or shower.
  • Revive rugs by spritzing with a water/vinegar solution and leaving for one hour before vacuuming.
  • Remove carpet stains by adding 2 tablespoons of salt to vinegar and rubbing onto hte stain.  Leave to dry then vacuum.
  • Use straight vinegar to clean stainless steel.
  • Make a natural wood cleaner by mixing 60ml of vinegar with 500ml of water and 2 tablespoons of olive oil and using as a polish to shine.

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www.finandfarm.co.uk

 

 

 

Raw Cider Vinegar – Your Kitchen Hero

Practical Advice – Storing and Using Spinach

spinach

Our organic spinach from Fletching Glasshouses is brilliant to have in the kitchen for more than just taste reasons.  The leaves are larger than baby spinach but not as large as the huge mature broad leaf.  This is a godsend in that it’s pretty versatile as it’s mild enough to shred in a salad but also robust enough to wilt – which is pretty hard to do with baby leaves.

Anyway you care to use it…it’s freshly picked when we deliver so we couldn’t possibly waste such a lovely bag of nutritious goodness!


How to cook spinach

The best way to cook spinach is to wilt it gently.  Just be careful not to overcook and lose the vibrant green colour and rich flavour.

Method

1.  Clean the spinach thoroughly to remove any grit from the leaves. Heat a large pan with a knob of butter
2.  Add the spinach – the leaves touching the base of the pan will wilt very quickly, so stir occasionally to ensure all of the raw leaves make contact with the base. Season with salt
3.  Once the spinach has just about wilted, remove the pan from the heat and strain off any excess liquid. Serve immediately.

How to store

A bag of slimy wilted leaves is pretty offputting.  Obviously, the best thing in the kitchen is to use up greens as quickly as possible to make the most of their nutritious benefits – but given that it isn’t always possible, you can extend the life with careful storage.

Here is a link to storing spinach with The Kitchn which gives you tried and tested results using different storage methods.  We love these blogs where people give really useful tips!  NB – this is why our leaves are always sold in plastic bags.  Not because we don’t have environmental concerns but but because even freshly picked leaves can dry and wilt while we are driving around the Sussex roads in the few hours from picking if they are put into brown paper bags.

saladgreens


 Alternative Ways to Use Spinach

There are loads of regular ways to use spinach…sauteed, soups dah di dah… But here are some more ways that may well be useful if you’re looking to add more greens to your diet…

Torta Pasqualina – OK this is a little late for Easter, but a delicious spinach, artichoke, parsley and egg pie is a perfect dish for either a vegetarian main course or even picnic slices (if the rain stays away).

torta-pasqualina1
Picture: http://www.misya.info/2014/04/01/torta-pasqualina.htm

Wilted Spinach Salad with Bacon Vinaigrette – It’s the vinaigrette made from a little of the melted bacon fat mixed with a red wine vinegar glaze that makes this so special.  This is a salad haters salad!


Quick Quesadillas – these are our daughter’s favourite snack from school and she can cook a pile of them in minutes.  Keep them healthy by using feta cheese and avoiding the sour cream.  Combine with a strawberry salsa for full antioxidant benefits.


Puree spinach and add to pancake batter for super-healthy pancakes.  They genuinely go with sweet fillings like banana and blueberry so if your kids are up for green pancakes, these really do work.


Spinach and aromatic herbs are perfect partners.  Combining with sage and parmesan makes this a perfect quick supper dish as Spaghetti Piemontesi

spaghettipiemont


Again, strong flavours work well with spinach and these little Creamy Smoked Haddock and Spinach Omelette Appetisers would work equally well left as longer wraps as part of a main course.

smokedhaddock


When our daughter was small, we kept pureed spinach in ice cube trays in the freezer and added it to just about everything.  We lost the habit as she got older and ate adult food but it’s a great way to add extra iron, vitamins and minerals to a dish quickly and without any hassle…whatever you’re cooking…pasta sauce, soups, stews etc.


Add to scrambled egg or scrambled tofu.  The flecks are pretty and it adds earthiness to any breakfast dish…and a bit less washing up than making a traditional Eggs Florentine.


Use pureed spinach as a pizza topping instead of tomato.  Just as delicious and a perfect partner for rich cheese melted on top.  Try this spinach garlic puree or even a spinach pizza base…(just don’t let anyone see the raw dough…it looks amazing cooked, but raw…really not a good advertisement for a delicious dough.


 

Visit us at

www.finandfarm.co.uk

Practical Advice – Storing and Using Spinach

Organic Heritage Salad Leaves from Fletching Glasshouses

saladbannerv1About Fletching Glasshouses

There’s always the risk that leaves form the base of a salad allowing other ingredients to take centre stage. But once you’ve served a really good salad leaf mix, then you are spoiled for ever after as second rate greenery just doesn’t cut the mustard..

Isobel and Emily Rae, who own and run Fletching Glasshouses have years of experience growing a broad variety of certified organic crops. It’s their experimental flair of combining leaves that has created really special fragrant and colourful salad mixes.

This season there’s a tantalising selection of mixed bags and also some fantastic heritage leaves to mix your own combinations.

Fletching

Fletching Glasshouses is pretty unique. Firstly, it’s no ordinary set of greenhouses as the Raes have dug a reservoir on the land. It’s not just a picturesque place to hang out but is a haven for wildlife and creates an environmentally supportive way of supplying water to the plants.

Secondly, the growing culture has a personal touch with the careful choice of leaves that they choose to plant. Every year the salads have a special secret ingredient – well, perhaps not secret, but something different to create exciting new flavours as the seasons progress.

Thirdly, the leaves are genuinely freshly picked. Early each morning, there is a team of people picking ready for collections a short while later – and we generally arrive on our collection round about 8ish or so – so the salads have not long left the ground. Leaves are bright and crunchy without the generally sad droop that you find in commercially packing.


 What’s in the Salad Mixes

In the winter salads you’ll find Tere – which isn’t well known as a salad leaf here but eaten widely in Turkey. It looks like a sturdy fleshy rocket leaf and has a wasabi kick which melts into a sweet aftertaste which is a little citrussy.

You’ll see Tere in the potent Mustard Mix salad, which compliments and adds roundness to the spicy Mustard frills and a little is added to the Herb and Spring Salad Mixes to give a small amount of keenness to the milder flavours.


Organic Mixed Bags

There are two mixes available this week – Summer Mix and Mustard Mix with a delicious Herb Mix soon to come:

Summer Mix

The Organic Summer Mix is a soft, leafy mix of seasonal leaves.  The actual mix varies week by week depending on what’s flourishing or picked but generally it’s an aromatic mix of:

  • A selection of young freshly picked lettuce leaves – Butterhead, Oak Leaf (Red and Green) and Little Gem
  • Chicory – Sugar Loaf and Rosso
  • Land Cress
  • Claytonia
  • Sorrel – Red Vein and French

Mustard Mix

A spicy mix of Tere, mustard leaf, mizuna and purple frilled leaf.  With a little salad from above to give balance – especially chicory to give the tang to compliment the sharper leaves.  This is a zesty salad mix.

  • Spicy Leaves – Tere, Red Mustard frills, Mizuna
  • Salad Mix – as above
  • Bitter mix – Sugar loaf chicory and Rosso

 Coming Soon – Herb Mix

Soon we will have some wonderful Herb Mix – gentle salad leaves with fragrant edible flowers – marigold and borage and added fragrant chives and parsley.


Organic Heritage Leaves

Currently, Fletching are also growing a fabulous range of heritage leaves that have been well known staples, but you generally don’t find in the shops…Here are just a few that are currently growing….

 Claytonia – you can buy this as a single leaf

 

Claytonia400x400

Also known as Winter Purslane or Miner’s Lettuce, Claytonia has pretty heart shaped leaves with tiny central flowers. Originally it grew in America and took its name from the California Gold Rush Miners who ate it to prevent scurvy. So, a leaf rich in vitamin C as well as the B vitamins and iron.

It’s a fantastic leaf as it isn’t bitter and is fresh tasting and mild. . It’s fairly fleshy, so can easily be used as a substitute for spinach – a pretty versatile leaf for the kitchen.

 Land Cress – available as a single leaf

landcress2

Land Cress is rich and peppery like watercress but a smaller denser leaf. It is a native cress although now it’s often known as American Cress and has always provided greenery through the winter months. These dense leaves are also pretty versatile and can be cooked – although they pretty much melt instantly, so flash cooking required.

Red Mustard Frills – also as a single leaf bag

mustard-red-frils

Picture from the Biking Gardener

Mustard greens are something of a superfood as they are reputed to reduce cholesterol and are anti-inflammatory and have powerful antioxidants according to studies.  Red Mustard frills has a vibrant wasabi flavour and crunchy texture – it’s the spiciest leaf in the mustard family.  The frills are radiant, deeply serrated leaves with slim green stems.

Mizuna – Also single leaf bags available

mizuna
Mizuna is has long deeply serrated silky leaves with trailing stems that meet at its root base. Mizuna has a bright sharp but earthy flavour which is a beautiful bridge between a spicy and a sweet salad leaf.

Salad Rocket – as a single leaf

Rocket400x400

The organic rocket that Fletching grows is a broad leafed mildly spicy variety with a full sweet flavour.  The peppery flavour of rocket is renowned for it’s pairing with deep smoky flavours like pancetta and parmesan.  It goes deliciously with the Mestó olive oil, where the grassy notes sit beautifully with fresh tangy rocket.

French Sorrel (from next week) – as a single leaf bag

frenchsorrel

Sorrel was once a staple leaf in British cooking and traditional medicine, but somehow dropped out of everyday use. French Sorrel is the broader larger leaf that we generally find under the name ‘Sorrel’ and a bit milder than the Red Vein variety.

It’s great with fish and eggs, but old recipes add it to Turnips and Swede and wilted down with butter as an accompaniment to goose or pork instead of apple sauce. The old cookery book we looked through described it as adding a ‘quickness’ to salads rather than tartness – which we think sounded beautifully descriptive.


 What to do with these wonderful leaves?

Cook up a fresh and healthy supper or brunch with a Land Cress Frittata with Ricotta and Parmesan…and in the spirit of being local, you could use Sussex Organic Ricotta and Veggie Parmesan cheese.

Land Cress in a delicious raw state works well in this recipe for Grilled Scallops with Land Cress and Tarragon Mayonnaise. If you can’t find scallops then chicken would work well and we stumbled across an intriguing blog which gave a recipe for vegan scallops.

Claytonia – Hearts for your heart. A healthy salad recipe with walnuts, parmesan and apples.There are loads of recipes but truthfully, it’s lovelier raw and even looks pretty in a vase.

salmonclaytoniasalad

Claytonia pairs beautifully with marjoram, avocado and nuts and white beans, as well as hard cheese, fish and shellfish. If serving with meat, the most delicious pairings are with duck and lamb.

Sorrel – where to start? It’s delightful with fish and eggs, but works as a perfect partner with goat’s or sheep’s cheese as well. Use as a foil for strong leafy greens and you’ll love it as a leaf in the Mustard Mix salad.

Try in the summer with a White Peach and Sorrel salad with honey vinaigrette for a real mix of sweet and tart flavours.

If you love Middle Eastern flavours, then try Yotam Ottolenghi’s recipe for Fried Beans with Sorrel, Feta and Sumac as lovingly described by David Lebovitz.

friedbeans

I have heard that in Crete Sorrel is used in a version of Dolmades – little folded pastry triangles stuffed with rice and seasoned with fresh herbs and cooked in olive oil.

Sorrel is also a fantastic partner to Salmon where a sorrel sauce is eaten in one form or other throughout Europe.

Pozole Verde is a traditional rich Mexican dish which uses wild sour-grass to contrast with pork belly and sharp lime, but in Diana Kennedy’s delicious recipe uses sorrel.

Mizuna has a bright and slightly earthy peppery flavour.  Try a delicious and simple potato salad by tossing fingerling potatoes with chopped mizuna and olive oil.

mizuna_potato_salad_1

Salad Rocket is made to go with pancetta and Jamie has the perfect recipe here for a warm salad.

When in doubt, then you can never go wrong with rocket pesto. Let’s face it, Basil is a summer veg but we want to enjoy some fresh greens and pesto takes seconds to whizz up in a food processor – and you can keep a jar in the freezer to cheer up a rainy day.

Make a powerful Salsa Verde with Red Mustard Frills, olive oil, garlic and capers.  Wonderful with pasta.

 

 Visit our website at

www.finandfarm.co.uk

 

 

Organic Heritage Salad Leaves from Fletching Glasshouses

Fingerling Potatoes – How to Store and Cook

Roasted-Fingerling-Poatoes-recipe

Picture of Rosemary Roasted Fingerling Potatoes from The Dish

After chatting with our aunt, she made a very good point that a meal without potato is missing a limb. That sums up how important potatoes are in all their gorgeous versatility.  Plus a good reason why we are excited that fingerlings are the potato of the month.  We can happily enjoy their sweet nutty flavour for the next four weeks…

Fingerlings appeared relatively late in potato history – both are Victorian varieties and specifically cultivated to create their unique texture and flavour.  La Rattes were Danish and Pink Fir Apples, British, but they rapidly emigrated across the channel to France where they became the chef’s darling.

Anyway, our potatoes, as you will have seen from previous blogs, come from the beautiful Morghew Park in Tenterden, the specialist potato farm which sits on the Kent and Sussex border, who manage to produce such a stunning collection of heritage potatoes.


 

Mixed Bags or Available Singly

The special offer potatoes this month are available as either single kilo bags, mixed 2kg bags if you like a selection or single 5kg boxes.


 

La Ratte Potatoes

La Ratte, also known as Asparge potato or La Reine du Touquet.  Even though they’re Danish, their legacy is definitely French as Rattes are the chef’s choice for famous French dishes and rich potato purees.  Equally they are delicious as salad potatoes or in casseroles and stews, as they keep their shape in cooking.  They have a pale cream skin and flesh and a slightly hazelnutty flavour.

laratte

Pink Fir Apple Potatoes

Pink Fir Apple potatoes are long and knobbly with a wonderful nutty, earthy flavour.  They boil and steam well, keeping their shape and are extremely delicious roasted.  They have a pinkish skin and creamy yellow flesh, which after cooking is satisfyingly waxy, soft and buttery.

pinkfir


 

How to store

Fingerling potatoes are less tough than other varieties as their skins are more delicate, so keeping them in the fridge can actually encourage them to absorb the damp and go off more quickly.  Ideally, keep them in a brown paper bag in a dark cool cupboard and they should stay fresher for a bit longer.


 

How to cook

These are absolutely perfect boiled or steamed as they hold their shape well.  Their nuttiness pairs smoothly with a smoked salt or in a salad.  Equally, they are delicious roasted. Either way, no need to peel as they are delicious in their skins.

Fingerlings are firm and waxy, which is why they have been so popular in French dishes where they are slow roasted with cream or butter and still keep their shape well.

Here are some more ways to use – plus a really interesting chocolate pastry recipe.  Some call for a Jersey Royal but La Ratte would work just as well.


Some ways to use Fingerling Potatoes

Don’t know about you but we can’t resist a roast potato.  Fingerlings are sublime roasted and this recipe with chive pesto is a glorious combination of colours. However, til local chives are through we would probably use a delicious spicy rocket or wild garlic, shoudl that still be available.

roasted-fingerlings-chive-pesto

The Secret Recipe Club has a delicious and healthy protein rich recipe which would make a quick midweek supper with her Roasted Broccoli and Fingerling Gribiche

Pizza and potatoes sounds like a step too far, but the waxy texture of fingerlings actually seems like it should work and provide that smooth creamy base for the blue cheese in this Gorgonzola and Fingerling Potatoes, Radicchio and Rosemary Pizza

As a side dish to a roast, fingerlings can cope with some robust flavours so don’t be put off by combining with strong flavours such as mustard, paprika, pancetta, bacon or other cured meats.  Roasted with a mustard crust here.

Or, there are a couple of stunning Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall recipes here which take the flavours one step further with the spicy Italian Devil potatoes and a rich Pan Haggerty, which is a Northumbrian dish of pan-fried potatoes, onion and cheese (we love this version!).

Or, and this one is intriguing and will be on our cooking list next weekend are waxy potato and chocolate pastries – we will keep you updated on that one.  This calls for Jersey Royals but La Ratte are perfect (and local) and our feeling is that the potato will be a creamy moist base for buttery pastry.

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Visit our website at

www.finandfarm.co.uk

Fingerling Potatoes – How to Store and Cook