Guide to Fin and Farm Pumpkins and Squashes

pumpkinandsquash

You know that the squash family varies so much in texture and flavour so here’s a handy checklist of the Sussex squashes we have for you this winter…

NB: All our squashes are sold by the kilo as they vary so much in size (no supermarket homogenisation here!)

Where they are grown

All the Biodynamic squashes are grown by Toos at her farm in Cuckfield and are ideally suited to the soil type she’s nurtured for the last 35 years.  Our organic squash are from Fletching Glasshouses, who grow in soil and maintain their greenhouses ethically by harnessing the natural warmth of light and using water from their own reservoir.  Our amazing farm on the Downs round the back of Worthing at Roundstone also grows conventionally fabulous stretches of beautiful outdoor pumpkins and squash.


 

BUTTERNUT SQUASH Size ranging from small to very large. Beautiful creamy skin and bright flesh – fabulous for roasting.  These are quite dense so could be easily used for desserts as a competent all rounder.  Biodynamic / Organic.

GEM SQUASH Like a bulbous dense courgette. Good for stews and ratatouilles.  Biodynamic / Organic.

GREEN HOKKAIDO SQUASH Small melon size. Green skin and dense orange flesh – wonderful for roasting individually, or using in desserts. Sweet and smooth.  Can eat the roasted skin if cooked long enough.  Biodynamic / Organic.

RED KURI SQUASH Small melon size. Bright reddish orange skin and flesh wonderful for roasting individually, or using in desserts. Sweet and smooth.  Can eat the roasted skin if cooked long enough.  Biodynamic / Organic.

SPAGHETTI  SQUASH Rugby ball size. Yellow tough skin and pretty creamy yellow flesh. When cooked properly, the flesh is similar to spaghetti and can be wound and served with a sauce as a fabulous vegetable substitute to pasta (see this link to our blog post ‘How to Cook Spaghetti Squash’).  Biodynamic / Organic.

BLUE CROWN PRINCE  SQUASH From rugby ball size to huge. Soft dove grey/blue skin and bright orange flesh. Fairly dense and sweet so a good all rounder and great for desserts.  Skin fairly tough so not really suitable for eating..  Biodynamic / Organic and also Conventional from Worthing.

FESTIVAL SQUASH Small individual size. With yellow/green dappled flesh and creamy gold flesh.  Good for roasting but the skin is just a little tough to eat.  Grown in Worthing.

ORANGE PUMPKIN Traditional Halloween pumpkin ranging from small to vast. Beautiful orange skin and flesh and good for all kinds of recipes.  The larger they are, the less dense, so bigger pumpkins are better for large scale soup making.  Grown in Worthing.

PATTY PAN SQUASH Flying saucer shaped squash ranging from small to huge.  A light yellow skin and pale creamy lime flesh.  More like a summer squash and an excellent seasonal substitute to courgette.  Holds shape fairly well when cooked as a courgette.  Organic.


 

Don’t read this link if you are at all hungry – it’s a newsfeed site to various foodie blogs which are all based on pumpkin and squash desserts…and we’ve picture the Chocolate Pumpkin Cake by Wildeorchard here – just for the photograph as much as anything, as its eye-wateringly beautiful.

pumpkinandchocolatecake

 

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Guide to Fin and Farm Pumpkins and Squashes

Super Veg Sprout Tops

sprouttopscooked

Firstly, cooked sprouts should never have a pungent sulphurous smell – if they have, it’s because they’re overcooked.  Same goes for the leaves – which should have a more delicate flavour and reduce to an almost silky texture…you might find even them a bit of a revelation, if you are a sprout-hater.

Continue reading “Super Veg Sprout Tops”

Super Veg Sprout Tops

Proper Sussex Bramley Apples

Bramley

The other day, Nick took this picture of these Bramley apples from the farm at Ringdens. Just so different from those monstrous waxy green supermarket specimens…. local fruit picked from orchards are blushed and rosy with an almost lime-coloured flecked white flesh, these have a wholesome apple flavour.  They are just slightly too tart to eat raw, but not massively.  Continue reading “Proper Sussex Bramley Apples”

Proper Sussex Bramley Apples

Guide to Fin and Farm Potatoes

Roastpotatoes

If you didn’t know better, then a glance at what we are offered commercially, you would imagine that we only have a few varieties of potato growing in the UK.  Many have fallen by the wayside as they are too delicate and prone to blight and the hardiest now make up pretty much 90% of what we are familiar with…which, to be honest, can be just dull.

Continue reading “Guide to Fin and Farm Potatoes”

Guide to Fin and Farm Potatoes

Nicola Potato – Our potato of the month!

Gratindauphinoise

Thanks to Nicki from the Potato Shop for the pic of her Gratin Dauphinois

The perfect potato for salads (and Gratin Dauphinois) – Nicola potato.  (By the way, so you can try this potato out, we have discounted it this month…).

There are loads of salad potatoes on the market, but Nicola is unusual as it has flavour that many other varieties lack.

This is a firm, waxy potato that stands up well to boiling and keeps its shape well.  It is an oval, smooth skinned potato with a creamy coloured flesh.  No real need to peel, but you can do for an even more refined finish.

Continue reading “Nicola Potato – Our potato of the month!”

Nicola Potato – Our potato of the month!

Savoy Cabbage – How to cook

Savoy

Durable is the word that springs to mind when I think of cabbage.  They withstand pretty much neglect before their cooked – but definitely no neglect when they are actually cooking.

Our organic savoys are grown biodynamically by Toos at Laines near Cuckfield (round the back of Lewes(.  The Sussex Downs soil is definitely suited to growing leaves, as they are glossy, large and dense with a mild, earthy flavour.

So steaming or braising?  While they are delicious simply cooked – there are better ways than steaming (although steaming is far preferable to boiling!).

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Savoy Cabbage – How to cook